Events

Human Rights Documentation – San Francisco, March 29, 2016

In an era of rapid technological innovation and increasing access to new data sets, the possibilities for reconceptualizing and revolutionizing our ability to document human rights violations are vast. These new and emerging tools, resources and data streams provide exciting opportunities for the field of human rights and social advocacy overall.

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Responsible Data for Human Rights Funders – San Francisco, January 19, 2016

Funders play a key role in improving responsible data practices. When we talk about responsible data, it’s often assumed those with the responsibility are those implementing advocacy campaigns. But it’s important to keep in mind that in our efforts to build awareness and practices around responsible data, the donor community also plays a key role.

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Data Visualization – New York, January 2016

In recent years data has become a key element in various struggles for social change. We use data not only as a means for research and investigation, but also as a fundamental building block for our communication and advocacy. Data is rarely communicated intuitively in spreadsheets, rather data visualization (dataviz) has become the visual currency for the data driven campaign. Yet little is known about the ethics and responsibilities of dataviz techniques, policies, and practices in analysis, advocacy, research and design.

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Documentary photography and photojournalism – New York, 28 March

Advances in technology and communication have dramatically altered the context in which photographers and photojournalists work. Through intensive labs and panel discussions, photographers will learn about emerging digital tools and methods to engage audiences across platforms and mobilize communities around social justice issues.

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Human rights documentation – Manila, 21-22 March 2015

Technological tools and innovations have dramatically altered the landscape of human rights documentation. Access to tools and the ability to collect, manage and disseminate information with relatively little technical training promise powerful opportunities for human rights defenders. But the use of these tools and strategies also introduces new risks and challenges, which are little understood in practice or in theory.

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Consent and crowdsourcing – Nairobi, 28 October 2014

The concept of informed consent is poorly adapted to our contemporary communication landscape, and the infinite potential for digital information to be shared, adapted, manipulated and re-used. This reality poses principled and practical challenges for anyone using digital and mobile tools to collect, manage and share data for social impact and human rights chance. This event will convene organizations that actively aggregate and mobilize crowdsourced and user-generated data for advocacy, to explore the necessity and the limits of informed consent for this type of data.

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Responsible resource sprint – Budapest, 30 Sep – 1 Oct 2014

This event will bring international thinkers and doers together with people from the front-lines of data-driven advocacy, to work towards useful and useable resources for meeting responsible data challenges. Reviewing and building everything that we have learned so far, this event will refine the tools and strategies already being developed, identify gaps, and continue building alliances across countries and sectors. Sessions throughout the 2-day resource sprint will focus on bringing an end-user perspective to responsible data strategies.

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Responsibility and private sector data – New York, 24 July 2014

This Responsible Data Forum will explore the responsibilities of public good and social justice initiatives seeking to access private sector data for their work. The private sector accumulates a tremendous amount of data. Market research, communications tracking, client relationship management, platform maintenance and market activities can all generate a wealth of information, which tends to be kept in the private domain. Recent national security revelations have raised questions about how such data is shared and managed, and reinforced calls for increased privacy standards and opt-out conditions for private sector data. At the same time, there is increasing recognition of how private sector and big data can be used for social good. Private corporations now regularly donate data sets to hackathons, research and humanitarian organizations, giving rise to the idea of data philanthropy.

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Responsible development data – New York, 22 May 2014

This Responsible Data Forum event is an effort to map the ethical, legal, privacy and security challenges surrounding the increased use and sharing of data in development programming. The Forum will aim to explore the ways in which these challenges are experienced in project design and implementation, as well as when project data is shared or published in an effort to strengthen accountability. The event will be a collaborative effort to begin developing concrete tools and strategies to address these challenges, which can be further tested and refined with end users at events in Amsterdam and Budapest.

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RDFhosting

Responsibility in hosting – Amsterdam, 19 May 2014

This Responsible Data Forum will explore the challenges facing public advocacy initiatives who host data online, and hosting providers who provide them with services. The forum will explore the ethical, privacy and security challenges posed by hosting and running an online system for data gathering, sharing, and storing, and develop responses to meet those challenges.

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Responsible data kick-off – Oakland, 6 March 2014

The Forum is an effort to develop useful tools and strategies for dealing with the ethical, security and privacy challenges facing data-driven advocacy. By bringing together activists, advocates, security thinkers, researchers and technology doers, the Forum will build on the challenges and experiences of actual advocacy, to nurture connections and develop reusable resources. See complete background here.

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